The Forums Forums Emotional Journey Is It Just Me? Never ending ADD humor

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 139 total)
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  • Misswho23
    Member

    I’m in.

    ipsofacto
    Member

    Scatty, there is a trans-Atlantic difference in the way this and that are used for describing a day in the future. If you are ever in the US, the most confusing local misuse of the language is to use the word bring instead of take. A parent might say to a child “are you bringing a lunch to school today”, meaning are you taking a lunch to school to day. The word bring has no connection to location here. When I first moved here, I must have looked very dense whenever bring was used in the wrong context. It would take my brain several seconds to figure out what was meant.

    It’s actually interesting in that I think ADDers in general tend to learn things in context, and sometimes miss the concept.

    Patte Rosebank
    Participant

    And then there’s “have a bath/shower/crap” vs. “take a bath/shower/crap”.

    In the UK, it’s actually a class distinction whether one “has” or “takes” one of these bathroom functions. Stephen Fry said so, in an episode of “Fry’s English Delight”, which is now in its 5th series of examining the history and workings of the English language.

    Misswho23
    Member

    “Fry’s English Delight”, looks interesting. I’ll have to see if I can find it online. I live in the US and I know we totally brutalize language. I’ve been told I do but never really figured out what. Most of the time I run into people who can not figure out the difference between “there” and “their”. It’s not that hard. Guess I learned that one early and drummed it into my brain. Probably so I wouldn’t miss it on a test in grade school or something. I still miss US meanings and I live here. But could be because I watch BBC. Eddie Izzard has a great comedy stand up routine about being dyslexic and the english language.

    I always use “take a shower”. Is that right? Well I guess to take would mean to remove something? I think well I have a shower in the bathroom but would I “have” a shower? This will be a fun thing to look up when I can’t sleep. I also use contractions a lot but not in professional work writing.

    I’ll have to follow in Robbos pursuit to be a better writer and use grammar properly. Since it’s a bring weak spot and I have to write another ton of resumes and cover letters this week for jobs. AARRGGGGHHHHHH. Is that a proper word? LOL

    Patte Rosebank
    Participant

    It’s at http:www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer . You can listen to episodes from everything that airs on BBC Radio, for one week after the broadcast.

    I’ve recorded the Wave Out streams, so I now have a huge collection of shows…mostly comedy, some new, and some classic.

    ipsofacto
    Member

    Larynxa, Thanks for the link.

    Comparing British and American English is always interesting. I know things have changed a lot in the nearly twenty years since I lived in the UK. I gather that the social imperative to use correct English language is much diminished these days. Not that I should talk; English Lang. was an ADD nightmare for me in school. More to do with the way it was taught than than any lack of interest on my part.

    Patte Rosebank
    Participant

    I have a pickle permanently implanted in my bum, regarding the correct usage and spelling of English words. It’s been up there ever since my mom (a former teacher) began teaching me how to read, almost from the day she brought me home from the hospital. Mom insisted on proper English, and on reading aloud so that words come to life.

    I can read in all directions, including upside-down and backwards, and I’m a professional audiobook narrator, Queen of the Cold-Read, and members of my family phone me for advice on spelling, instead of consulting a dictionary.

    I also absorb accents like a sponge, and, since so many of the shows I watch and listen to are from the UK, I now use many English expressions and pronunciations. I even have tripthongs now!

    ipsofacto
    Member

    That’s a huge advantage. My wife teaches elementary, including some years in K, and first. My daughter was immersed in learning materials from birth. That may be why, she is only now having more difficulties with ADHD.

    Misswho23
    Member

    Larynxa,

    Thanks for the link. I’ll check it out.

    Patte Rosebank
    Participant

    Misswho23,

    “AARRGGGGHHHHHH” is a real word.

    There is also the Peanuts variant: “AAAUUUGGGHHH”.

    g.laiya
    Member

    rick i suspect your wife is much more understanding/forgiving of the insurance penalties than my husband is , otherwise might be a fun experiment – and would certainly make it easier getting the kids in and out with the extra room i’d have if that pole were to somehow not be there any longer…..just hope i don’t find out by accident!

    scatty, i’m wondering now…. do you think the people who design and build parking structures are in cahoots with the local body shops? could it be they are even owned by the same people? that would sure explain some things! ;)

    Misswho23
    Member

    Did anyone ever figure out the math to get us synced up? How many Add’ers does it take to do math? I’m a right brained artist so I’m sure I could give you the time in an alternate parallel existence. But I may be the only one logged on. Having wonderful conversations with myself. Oops did I let that out?

    Patte Rosebank
    Participant

    Here’s an example of ADD humour, from Abbott & Costello.

    The excerpt is from “Lou’s Birthday”, and it’s my favourite episode, because of the incredible pathos, mixed with the comedy.

    http://youtu.be/hgUAQSGnEio

    Awe…that just makes me sad :( Poor guy. Great actor!

    Patte Rosebank
    Participant

    He came by that pathos naturally, because he had so much pain in his real life. People called him “Hard Luck Lou”, because of it.

    The worst was when his baby son, Butch, drowned in the swimming pool (that Lou had always dreamed of having), just hours before Butch was to be allowed to stay up and listen to his dad’s radio show for the very first time.

    Lou went on and did the show, because he knew that Butch would be listening, wherever he was. As soon as the show was over, Lou went backstage and collapsed…and Bud Abbott then told the audience what had happened earlier that day.

    If you watch the “Abbott & Costello” TV show or movies, you’ll notice that Lou always wears a thick, gold bracelet, with an engraved plate on it. The plate was engraved with Butch’s name, and Lou never took it off. In fact, he’d had it permanently linked closed, by the jeweller who made it.

Viewing 15 posts - 91 through 105 (of 139 total)
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